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Volume 3, Issue 1, June 2019, Page: 17-24
A Mixed Methods Inquiry into the Quality of Instructional Designs and Use of Moodle Learning Management Systems in Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Foluso Ayeni, Global Technology Management and Policy Research Group, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
Mary Adewunmi, Global Technology Management and Policy Research Group, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
Femi Ekanoye, Global Technology Management and Policy Research Group, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
Tanisha Pruitt, Global Technology Management and Policy Research Group, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
Victor Mbarika, Global Technology Management and Policy Research Group, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
Gabriel Fagbeyiro, Global Technology Management and Policy Research Group, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
Jarrett Landor, Global Technology Management and Policy Research Group, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
Felicitas Aquegho, Global Technology Management and Policy Research Group, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
Received: Feb. 28, 2019;       Accepted: Jul. 3, 2019;       Published: Jul. 15, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajeit.20190301.14      View  368      Downloads  65
Abstract
There is no doubt that the demand for e-learning has increased tremendously across the globe. Our main observation is that both students and Faculty have expressed overall satisfaction in the use of E-learning systems and Educational technologies. From concept to content, there have been calls for quality assurance in E-learning most especially in the area of Instructional Designs (IDs) and use of Learning Management Systems (LMS). Quality Management is a vital part of any E-learning application. Tertiary Institutions have spent heavily and are soon expecting Return on Investments which cannot be undermined. The purpose of this study is to investigate quality in Instructional designs and use of Moodle LMS. Faculties of Southern University, an Historically Black College and University (HBCU) were interviewed to identify current state and perceived challenges as well as helpful components based on their online experiences. Survey was also carried out to further support our qualitative inquiry. Results of this study indicated that most students and faculty needs an open mindset, motivation, standardized course design, time management and comfortableness with online educational technologies to achieve quality. Interviewee also indicated difficulty in understanding the use, technical problems, cost and lack of training as challenges. Suggestions for addressing the challenges were provided.
Keywords
E-learning, Educational Technologies, Instructional Design, Learning Management Systems, Quality
To cite this article
Foluso Ayeni, Mary Adewunmi, Femi Ekanoye, Tanisha Pruitt, Victor Mbarika, Gabriel Fagbeyiro, Jarrett Landor, Felicitas Aquegho, A Mixed Methods Inquiry into the Quality of Instructional Designs and Use of Moodle Learning Management Systems in Historically Black Colleges and Universities, American Journal of Education and Information Technology. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2019, pp. 17-24. doi: 10.11648/j.ajeit.20190301.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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